Canon 10×30 Image Stabilizing binoculars.

Canon 10x30 Image Stabilizing binoculars A big, unexpected leap forward in enjoyment.

Around this time I’d befriended Adrian, a colleague and fellow amateur astronomer, who had even built several of his own Dobsonian telescopes. They were beauties, too. Anyway, I wanted to buy a telescope, but he wisely suggested I spend time exploring the sky with a good set of binoculars. In particular, he was very fond of the Canon line of Image Stabilizing binoculars.

I had used Dad’s standard 7×50 binos for years, and I’d hoped to get my own set with similar, 50mm objective lenses. I had been impressed with how much light they could collect. Unfortunately, in 2001, the Canon 15×50 IS model cost over $1000. So, I settled for Canon’s 10×30 IS binos, and I’ve been very happy with them. I could attempt to explain how the image stabilization works, but it doesn’t matter–what really counts is that, without the stars jiggling all around, I can see way more detail, and many more stars. That really surprised me, how much more I could see when I could just relax my eyes and look. As I write this, several years later, the Canon 10x30s are what I grab when I step outside for some instant astronomical gratification. They work very well with my glasses or without. I paid around $450 for them, but the cost has come down to around $300. There’s even a new, smaller, lower-cost model.

When Comet Encke was nearby in the winter of 2003-2004, either the Canon 10x30s or my eyes weren’t up to the task of gathering enough light. Which lead me to my next purchase…

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16 Comments on “Canon 10×30 Image Stabilizing binoculars.”


  1. […] naked eye- traced the entire Ursa Major for the first time! Also Canes Venaticei. With Canon 10×35 Image Stabilizing binoculars, traced Coma Berenices, saw Mel 111 within. Saw Arcturus rising. Explore posts in the same […]


  2. […] 2/11/04 10:00-10:30PM- naked eye- traced Leo for first time! Starry Night Pro helped. With Canon 10×30 Image Stabilizing binoculars- traced Crab Nebula, found M44 Beehive cluster. Saw Jupiter in Leo, three moons: Ganymede/Io, […]


  3. […] and Nekkar, with HIP72582 and HIP72469 pointing right at it. No doubt, there it was, with only Canon 10×30 Image Stabilizing binoculars […]


  4. […] Log 3/30/04 3/40/04, 7:30PM-8:30PM. Canon 10×30 Image Stabilizing binoculars An enjoyable time just browsing around. My idea to try using Norton’s Atlas rather than […]


  5. […] for the holidays, so time has been less predictable. Still, I managed to spot Venus at 4PM with the Canon 10×30 Image Stabilizing binoculars, after spending 30 minutes trying to find it without aid. My single-eye theory hasn’t worked […]


  6. […] 9PM, on a whim, I checked out the sky, and surprise surprise: stars! I grabbed my Canon 10×30 Image Stabilizing binoculars and scanned around Procyon and found the comet almost immediately. I could see a faint nucleus when […]


  7. […] the evening, before bed, I enjoyed the moon through the Canon 10×30 Image Stabilizing binoculars for a while. The mosquitoes were enjoying me even more, I […]


  8. […] my surprise, I see as much through the Canon 10×30 Image Stabilizing binoculars as I do through the standard Oberwerks 11×70s. I would have thought that I’d have […]


  9. […] but between clouds, lousy seeing, cold, and the moon, I haven’t spotted M1, either with the Canon 10×30 Image Stabilizing binoculars or the Oberwerk 11×70 binoculars. I hope it’s just a matter of learning to look better, […]


  10. […] new respect for those Oberwerk 11×70 binoculars. I had written that, counter-intuitively, the Canon 10×30 Image Stabilizing binoculars seemed to show me just as many stars. At that point, I hadn’t spent much time with the […]


  11. […] tonight, but luck was on my side. I went out around 9:30PM, and saw stars, so I grabbed the Canon 10×30 Image Stabilizing binoculars and spent about 45 minutes searching for Kemble’s […]


  12. […] I ran Starry Night and looked up the brightest cluster on my new target list. I grabbed the Canon 10×30 Image Stabilizing binoculars, printed out a few quick finder charts, and headed […]


  13. […] Mars and the Pleiades; Saturn and the Beehive Cluster; the Christmas Tree Cluster (which the Canon 10×30 Image Stabilizing binoculars are just not up to); the Orion Nebula (looking clearer than I’ve seen in a while); even the […]


  14. […] just the right time. I used my laptop, my Oberwerk 11×70 binoculars on a cheap tripod, and my Canon 10×30 Image Stabilizing binoculars for quick […]


  15. […] with a quick reference Sky & Telescope’s article and to Starry Night. I started with the Canon 10×30 Image Stabilizing binoculars, could only see a faint fuzzy, so I went back inside for the Oberwerk 11×70 binoculars & […]


  16. […] doing way over there? It was a rare clear night, the moon isn’t out, so I grabbed theCanon 10×30 Image Stabilizing binoculars and got outside for a half hour. I saw the Beehive Cluster, the Perseus Double Cluster, […]


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